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Happy #FigFriday! We’re featuring our first Featured Fig today. Meet, Lydia Albano! Check out her work and 5 interview answers. Congrats!
1. What do you enjoy most about Figment and its community?Lydia: There’s a lot I love about Figment: I tend to be a very self-deprecating writer and it’s both encouraging and humbling to receive such amazing feedback from other young writers like myself. I think, though – and this may be selfish – that the thing I’ve appreciated most about having Figment is that once I post something, there’s pressure to finish it! Fortunately for me, people get mad when you leave them hanging. I don’t know if I’d ever finish anything without the pressure.
2. What is your favorite story that you have written and shared on Figment and why?Lydia: Definitely Finding You. A large part of the reason I’ve loved writing it (though I didn’t initially plan for the theme of human trafficking, which has been…exciting) is the response in the comments from so many Figment users; you’ve all become so involved in the characters and so protective of them that they feel more real than ever to me. I think Finding You is the first piece I’ve written that I personally loved and envisioned each character equally, even the minor ones. Writing it, I loved being swept up in the story as much as my readers, along the many twists and turns that I didn’t even see coming.
3. Where do you find inspiration to write and keep writing?Lydia: The stories in my head never really stop. Honestly I attribute that to God’s blessing, that I have a crazy stupid imagination that won’t turn off. Even when I’m stuck with my lovely friend Writer’s Block, I’m usually just super frustrated because I still want to be writing. Also, I usually feel that I owe it to my characters to give them an ending, once I get started.
4. What is the last book that you read?Lydia: The Night Circus, by Erin Morgenstern. It took me long enough to jump on the bandwagon, but I might be a little bit obsessed now and I might consider myself a rêveur now and I mightbe planning my own Night-Circus-themed party.
5. Do you have any advice for other Figgies looking to improve their writing?Lydia: READ YOUR WORK ALOUD TO YOURSELF. I know, I know, it’s cliched, but I think it’s crucial to having work that flows. It’s hard for me to read something that’s choppy, no matter how much I love you. And if I can sneak in a bit of a cheat for my friends sharing entire novels: as far as posting on Figment goes, I strongly suggest breaking your chapters up into smaller segments. In my experience, it keeps people reading and is better for the flow and keeping your readers’ attention, and trust me, I want to read your work! You all are inspiring to me.

Happy #FigFriday! We’re featuring our first Featured Fig today.

Meet, Lydia Albano! Check out her work and 5 interview answers. Congrats!

1. What do you enjoy most about Figment and its community?
Lydia: There’s a lot I love about Figment: I tend to be a very self-deprecating writer and it’s both encouraging and humbling to receive such amazing feedback from other young writers like myself. I think, though – and this may be selfish – that the thing I’ve appreciated most about having Figment is that once I post something, there’s pressure to finish it! Fortunately for me, people get mad when you leave them hanging. I don’t know if I’d ever finish anything without the pressure.

2. What is your favorite story that you have written and shared on Figment and why?
Lydia: Definitely Finding You. A large part of the reason I’ve loved writing it (though I didn’t initially plan for the theme of human trafficking, which has been…exciting) is the response in the comments from so many Figment users; you’ve all become so involved in the characters and so protective of them that they feel more real than ever to me. I think Finding You is the first piece I’ve written that I personally loved and envisioned each character equally, even the minor ones. Writing it, I loved being swept up in the story as much as my readers, along the many twists and turns that I didn’t even see coming.

3. Where do you find inspiration to write and keep writing?
Lydia: The stories in my head never really stop. Honestly I attribute that to God’s blessing, that I have a crazy stupid imagination that won’t turn off. Even when I’m stuck with my lovely friend Writer’s Block, I’m usually just super frustrated because I still want to be writing. Also, I usually feel that I owe it to my characters to give them an ending, once I get started.

4. What is the last book that you read?
Lydia: The Night Circus, by Erin Morgenstern. It took me long enough to jump on the bandwagon, but I might be a little bit obsessed now and I might consider myself a rêveur now and I mightbe planning my own Night-Circus-themed party.

5. Do you have any advice for other Figgies looking to improve their writing?
Lydia: READ YOUR WORK ALOUD TO YOURSELF. I know, I know, it’s cliched, but I think it’s crucial to having work that flows. It’s hard for me to read something that’s choppy, no matter how much I love you. And if I can sneak in a bit of a cheat for my friends sharing entire novels: as far as posting on Figment goes, I strongly suggest breaking your chapters up into smaller segments. In my experience, it keeps people reading and is better for the flow and keeping your readers’ attention, and trust me, I want to read your work! You all are inspiring to me.

Your Daily Theme: Smiling
People smile during every type of emotion. It is a cover, or a front, or an instinctual/sarcastic response. Write a scene in which a character smiles, but he or she is not happy. Think about how someone smiles when they are angry, or sad, or frightened, or nervous. Pick one of these emotions to portray with a smile.

Your Daily Theme: Smiling

People smile during every type of emotion. It is a cover, or a front, or an instinctual/sarcastic response. Write a scene in which a character smiles, but he or she is not happy. Think about how someone smiles when they are angry, or sad, or frightened, or nervous. Pick one of these emotions to portray with a smile.

Source figment.com

Your Daily Theme: Opening Line 
"His breath was coming in short bursts. If he had known that society was going to  collapse violently, he definitely would have done more cardio."
Use this line as inspiration for a poem, scene, or short-story.

Your Daily Theme: Opening Line 

"His breath was coming in short bursts. If he had known that society was going to  collapse violently, he definitely would have done more cardio."

Use this line as inspiration for a poem, scene, or short-story.

Source figment.com

Click here for a free copy of Georgetown Academy Book 1, a digital choose-your-character adventure.
THEN enter your own Georgetown Academy story for a chance to be published in Book 4 AND for an opportunity to pitch a manuscript to Coliloquy, GA’s publishers!
(via The Georgetown Academy Contest | The Daily Fig)

Click here for a free copy of Georgetown Academy Book 1, a digital choose-your-character adventure.

THEN enter your own Georgetown Academy story for a chance to be published in Book 4 AND for an opportunity to pitch a manuscript to Coliloquy, GA’s publishers!

(via The Georgetown Academy Contest | The Daily Fig)

Your Daily Theme: Struggle
Every story has conflict, some kind of internal or external struggle for a character. If your story is falling flat, inserting more or different conflict might be the solution. Even small conflict helps illuminate a character.
Place your character in an everyday situation, but create a minor and persistent annoyance. Maybe his cell phone is drained. Maybe her shoelace is broken. Have your character perform some everyday errands with this annoyance. How does he/she respond?
Possible annoyances:
Drained cell phone
Broken shoelace
A large zit 
Can’t find the car keys
Alarm didn’t go off in the morning
Something in his/her shoe
Painful hangnail 

Your Daily Theme: Struggle

Every story has conflict, some kind of internal or external struggle for a character. If your story is falling flat, inserting more or different conflict might be the solution. Even small conflict helps illuminate a character.

Place your character in an everyday situation, but create a minor and persistent annoyance. Maybe his cell phone is drained. Maybe her shoelace is broken. Have your character perform some everyday errands with this annoyance. How does he/she respond?

Possible annoyances:

  • Drained cell phone
  • Broken shoelace
  • A large zit 
  • Can’t find the car keys
  • Alarm didn’t go off in the morning
  • Something in his/her shoe
  • Painful hangnail 

Source figment.com